London

London.JPG

London is the first, largest, and most famous city
in Britain. As all lettered men of Camelot know, Prince
Aeneas, a survivor of the sack of Troy, founded the Roman
tribe. His great-grandson Brutus led a sea-borne
migration of Trojan exiles westward and eventually
settled on this island. The natives called their land Albion,
but the conquerors changed its name to Brutusland,
later corrupted to Britain.
Brutus built the city Troia Nova, or New Troy (later
Trinovantes), as his capital. According to Geoffrey
of Monmouth, this occurred at the same time that “the
priest Eli was ruling in Judea and the Ark of the Covenant
was captured by the Philistines” — i.e., sometime
between 1115 and 1075 BC.
A thousand years later, shortly before the coming
of Julius Caesar, King Lud fortified the city and changed
its name to Kaerlud, or Fort of Lud. A century later, the
Romans conquered the land; its name was corrupted to
Kaerlundein, and eventually London.
To the native Cymric city the Romans added their
own typical urban buildings: a legionary camp, basilica,
coliseum, baths, and temples. They also built the
famous London Bridge, which is the only bridge that
spans the navigable parts of the Thames River.
Two castles help to protect London. At the west
end is the Castle Lud, built over the old site of Kaerlud.
At the eastern edge of the city is the White Tower,
originally built by the Roman Emperor. The massive keep
and castle serve as a royal residence and as refuge of last
resort in times of war or uprising.
London is large and influential enough to be a political
power in its own right. It is run by a city senate
that determines internal affairs, such as judging its citizens
in the city court rather than a king’s or nobleman’s
court. The senate appoints leaders, called praetors, for
specific tasks.
London rules over its surrounding countryside, the
County of London, and also has its own permanent garrison,
which also serves as night watch, police, and firemen.
Although adequate for manning the walls, though,
this standing army of footmen is inferior in the field.
Since London has no expansionist ambitions, its relatively
small military force has usually proved sufficient.

London

Pendragon on the Humber oliver_pawsey